Happy birthday, quidditch!

Quidditch was founded on October 9, 2005 at Middlebury College by Xander Manshel and Alex Benepe. Looking for a variation on their normal Sunday activities, they gathered friends and laid the foundation for a game that has grown in leaps and bounds to become a widely respected, mixed gender sport. Today, over 8,000 players in nearly 40 countries play quidditch.

This website chronicles the rise of quidditch from the perspective of the organizers, players, and photographers who have shaped the sport into what it is today. From October 9-23, 2020, US Quidditch will be highlighting a different part of the sport’s history. New content will be posted every day. Special thanks goes to Alicia Radford, author of the book Quidditch Turns Ten. Much of the content on this website comes from Radford’s book, originally published in 2015. 

Photos by Shirley Lu, Chris Rothery, Nikki Smith, and Isabella Gong. 

Purchase Quidditch Turns Ten

The book is on sale for $15.00 through October 23, 2020

Part IV

Part IV

Photos by: Isabella Gong and Jessica Jiamin Lang Editor’s note, October 28, 2020: The original version of this article contained an error. Amanda Dallas was not credited as one of the co-founders of MLQ. We, at USQ, regret the error. More broadly, this article and others in the history series will be updated to address the lack of diversity in the original text of Quidditch Turns Ten, as well as to more thoroughly discuss quidditch in the past 5 years. Each article will be reviewed and...

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Part III

Part III

Photos by: Kat Ignatova, Kean Goh, and Isabella Gong. Editor’s note, October 28, 2020: This article and others in the history series will be updated to address the lack of diversity in the original text of Quidditch Turns Ten, as well as to more thoroughly discuss quidditch in the past 5 years. Each article will be reviewed and re-released for more inclusivity. Current and past quidditch community members will be invited to contribute to the updated articles, so that we can more accurately...

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Part 2

Part 2

Left: A Michigan State University player. Until 2014 there were no restrictions on what counted as a player number. Top right: The Penn State Three Broomsticks prepare for a match. Although it was not always called by referees, World Cup IV was the first year that teams were not allowed to wear capes during gameplay. Bottom right: An Ives Pond seeker and chaser run out to start the game. In quidditch, each position is marked by a different colored headband. Seekers wear yellow, chasers wear...

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Part I

Part I

Photos by: Steve Mease Editor’s note, October 28, 2020: This article and others in the history series will be updated to address the lack of diversity in the original text of Quidditch Turns Ten, as well as to more thoroughly discuss quidditch in the past 5 years. Each article will be reviewed and re-released for more inclusivity. Current and past quidditch community members will be invited to contribute to the updated articles, so that we can more accurately tell the story of the past 15...

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Introduction

Introduction

Editor’s note, October 28, 2020: This article and others in the history series will be updated to address the lack of diversity in the original text of Quidditch Turns Ten, as well as to more thoroughly discuss quidditch in the past 5 years. Each article will be reviewed and re-released for more inclusivity. Current and past quidditch community members will be invited to contribute to the updated articles, so that we can more accurately tell the story of the past 15 years and include voices...

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